Ready, Set, Go! Taking Our Mission to New Heights

By Giving List Staff   |   May 8, 2021
food delivered to elderly person during epidemic lockdown isolation

Realities that became clear in 2020 and, by all accounts, will prevail for the next few years, have informed how we plan to help our Community in 2021 and beyond. Whether they’re seniors in assisted living, hourly wage-earning families living in multi-generational households, or the newly unemployed confronted with joblessness due to Covid-related layoffs, we’re ready to take our mission to new heights.

It Would Be Unconscionable to “Un-See” What We Saw in 2020

– More than 1 in 14 seniors live in poverty locally

– The working poor, the bulk of our clients, still live on small fixed incomes that in no way cover typical monthly expenses

– When more than 30% of their income is earmarked for housing, nutritional food often becomes unaffordable for local seniors and others who are physically or economically vulnerable

– Food insecurity remains a huge problem in our Community with each passing year, as basic nutritional needs go unmet for children through seniors

– Population subgroups already strained economically are especially susceptible to the negative impact of unexpected events, like this most recent pandemic

– Many in our Community are homebound and have limited transportation options

– Social isolation, loneliness, and depression have spiked in the last 14 months

So What Do We Do NOW?

– Grow our inventory of food and other essentials so that not a single vulnerable, isolated, or senior resident in need of food is turned away — and allow them to shop twice a month.

– Don’t stop offering grocery deliveries to our isolated and most vulnerable clients still impacted by the pandemic.

– Expand and deepen the impact of our senior volunteer effort. We must find a way to get evenmore of the handiworks and custom gifts our senior program volunteers make into the hands and homes of those who need to feel they’ve not been forgotten!

We See Glimmers on the Horizon…

And look forward to the day very soon when our outreach will expand anew: allowing clients and their families safely inside our space to shop for exactly what they want and need, whether it’s in the Grocery and Clothing Store, in the Back-to-School Pop-Up, or in the Holiday Gift Shoppe; reopening our Volunteerism Programs in full and giving the Community the opportunity to be of service; supporting the newly jobless and youth through Job Smart, our employment readiness program; and welcoming the Community back into Gift Shoppe on State Street in search of donated but unique treasures, like clothing, jewelry, home furnishings and more!

 

Unity Shoppe

unityshoppe.org
Phone: (805) 979-9511
Donor Relations Director: Pat Hitchcock

Mission

Unity Shoppe, Inc.
For over 100 years, Unity Shoppe, Inc. has been building a sustainable support system for all those in our Community who face unforeseen crises by providing free, essential services: nutritious food, school clothing, senior care and volunteerism programs, and job training for youth and adults. Always a-political, non-denominational, and non-discriminatory: Unity Shoppe, Inc. is here for everyone.

Begin to Build a Relationship

We know you care about where your money goes and how it is used. Connect with this organization’s leadership in order to begin to build this important relationship. Your email will be sent directly to this organization’s director of development and/or Executive Director.

I Never Thought This Would Happen to Me

“Guardian angels have shown up throughout my life: my husband moved from New York for me, my district manager encouraged me to become a retail store manager, and last year it was Unity Shoppe. We lost our lease without warning and needed to move into a hotel with our children. Unity provided us with months of needed groceries. Today, we’re in our own place and eager to give back. We want others to know they’re not alone – it’s okay to ask for help!”
– Laura Symmonds

Striving to Become Debt Free

Fulfilling its mission and running a nonprofit at the scale of Unity Shoppe is a costly endeavor. A key component of maintaining sustainability is eliminating overhead. Currently Unity Shoppe is carrying $3.5 million in mortgage debt before it owns its property and is able to apply annual fundraising dollars entirely to support programs and services for Community residents in need. Donations designated to pay down the mortgage will be matched up to $1 million dollars by an anonymous donor.

Board of Directors

Cynthia Hooper, Vice Chairman, Community West Bank
Barbara E. Tellefson, President/Director of Operations, In Memoriam
Patti Boucher, Secretary, Union Bank VP
Reed Spangler, Treasurer-Financial Officer, MacFarlane & Faletti
Les Carroll, KZSB Radio General Manager
Frank Corral, Meta Law, Inc.
Susan Rodriguez, Brown & Brown Insurance President
Jerry Herzberg, Jer’s Repairs Heating and Air
Kenneth Kahn, Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians
Jonatha King, King Communications Owner
David Prichard, US Trust, B of A Private Wealth Management
Thomas D. Reed, Executive Director